Final Review of Braquo. A French Police drama series. Series One, two, three and four. Minor spoilers only. In French with English subtitles. This final review follows on from my first review posted on the 4th of December, 2016.

 

French noir.

Braquo.
Final review.

So Braquo just got better and better really. Although it did suffer a case of minor re-programming by the time it got to series four.

Braquo was really rather wonderful. What can I say. Words are superfluous and I don’t want to spoiler or ruin it. Certainly watching all four series in a row was a rare treat.

Plus as always watching a series set circa early 2000, is fresh fun and different. Compared to now.

As you watch the years ticking on however, in the dates of the series: you know that time is running out. Sooner or later, it’s going to get re-programmed somehow. and so it does. But not too irrevocably thankfully.

Although they may well have stopped swearing, lustily and gloriously, in French. Which of course was incorrectly translated anyway. At least one of those words, never is. In dramas. As it’s too rude I guess.

But it’s the nuances of the word. How it means a myriad of different things. At that time. And it sounds so great when they say it. But I digress.

Yes, Braquo was, as previously described (in my first review) very understated. As a drama.

I like how the team barely speak to each other. Théo, Eddie Caplan, Walter Morlighem and Roxanne. They don’t need to. They know each other so well.

They, the old friends, don’t hang around on their mobiles either. Plus there are no computer screens come to think of it. Not that I barely noticed. But thank God.

I like how the series doesn’t translate text messages either. Which are in a different language than French. We are left to figure it out on our own. As we often have to do within the drama too.

You are having to calculate some behind the scenes action and consequences.

I liked that everything wasn’t spelled out for us. This aspect of watching the drama reflected that same reality for the crew too, sometimes. Although they were obviously a lot more clued up then we were!

This is a show where you can’t really afford to miss a minute of action or even silent cogitations from the ever effortlessly effervescent Eddie Caplan. Nope.

If you miss a minute you may well miss a whole link in the subterranean and increasingly gargantuan, elephantine even, every growing plot. Serpentine in it its constrictions, as it wriggles and constricts around the characters inexorably toward the end.

 
Postscript.
One text message is shown translated at the very end.

I think I mentioned in my first review of Braquo, episode one of series one, that Braquo was unutterably, irrevocably cool.  Well yes. Braquo ate cool for breakfast.

Braquo chewed down cool. digested it, imbibed it, exuded cool.

Braquo was so cool it made uncool the new cool.

Be careful or you may find yourself wearing a vaguely sheepskin or leather jacket, strutting moodily down the city street, impressively impassive of expression.

My favourite gangsters were: Jordania, Atom the Armenian guy and Lemoine. Plus the apparently bumbling and ineffectual Police Chief.

After a while you realise that the crew are permanently and ever professionally on call.  They just rest in between jobs.

Plus we discover an interesting link between their SPYG/ Special Forces Unit and some of the other characters.

 

His crew pronounce Edie as: “Edeeee”.

eg.

Edeeeee!

 

We love you Paris.

Beyond. An American supernatural drama series. A Netflix Original. On Netflix in the United Kingdom. A One-off Review. Minor spoilers only.

 


American noir.

Beyond.

An American supernatural drama series.

A One-off Review.

Some notes and dialogue on first watching.

So loving Beyond. I’m on, not sure what episode, (OK) episode Four now.

Beyond is fresh, fun and different.

I like how at the end of the episode there are multiple stills from that episode.

This style seems outrageously unusual if you have never seen it before. But it used to be a common technique. After movies. In the 90’s.

All I can say is look out for Dustin Hoffman in his Tootsie look. In the yellow jacket..

There are soppy bits but then there is funny bits too. There are serious horror laden scenes..

Jeff is a great character.

So Beyond is probably very silly in parts but it still works.  Mostly because there is some very fine acting. Throughout.

 

Some dialogue.
The yellow jacket man:
“It’s the hour of the wolf, the dawn, when the most people are born and the most people die..”
Ramon:
“Yeah, but who’s the wolf?”

At one point two characters start talking in film quotes to each other.

***

Final episode.

Some notes and dialogue made on first watching.

Song:
Came on a rainy Tuesday..
“In the afternoon..”
“Thought I heard you talking softly..
“Where is the life that I recognise”..
Boring ballad ensues.

You know some spooky thing is about to happen. Just before the end..

Uh oh. What did I tell you.

Charlie to the yellow jacket man:
“Still rocking that yellow jacket?!”
“All you need is a big hat and a monkey..”

Later..

Great stuff.

 

The end.

***

Review of Beyond.

So Beyond is a strange yet interesting and enjoyable mix of Wayward Pines series one, The 4400, The Prisoner. With dollops of slightly regrettable magical fantasy interludes (and I say this as a fan of magical fantasy).

I say regrettable because not all of these interludes, artistically as they are created, work. Within the drama. As in successfully carry on the fairly intense yet quietly building story.

Of how the young twelve year old boy who went into a coma wakes up, miraculously one day. And he is twenty five years old..

 

 

© Copyright Clarissima 2017.  All rights reserved.

 

This work or any portion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the express written permission of the publisher except for the use of brief quotations in a book review.

admin@ clarissima-adayinthelifeofatvwatcher.london

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This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, businesses, places, events and incidents are either the products of the author’s imagination or used in a fictitious manner. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, or actual events is purely coincidental.

 

 

 

The OA. A mini-potted one-off review of the first twenty minutes. Minor Spoilers only. On Netflix in the United Kingdom.

Netflix.
The OA.

An American Science-Fiction drama series.

A mini-potted review of the first twenty minutes.

So the OA is ludicrous tosh. So far. But then I only gave it twenty minutes. Or so.

For the life of me I canna remember how the doleful and artfully styled woman returns home. From being missing for umpteen years since she was about nine. And blind. But she has come back very different..

Now I had problems believing that her character was a teenager. As she looked so very much older. To me.

Anyway she returns after her mysterious absence to a gloomily lit backwater with a slightly sinister air. An ostensibly nice house in a suburb. One house in a development.

A Housing development that was never finished. Because “they” ran out of money. Or something to that effect.

As the antediluvian (by which I mean ancient in appearance) and strangely intense mother of the girl/ woman explains. As they walk one dark night, down the empty road. Where they live.

The mother picks up debris, a sign?  (it is deliberately unclear) from the grass. Spooky.

Apart from this early promising bit of atmosphere described: the young woman who was once girl (it’s all a bit ickily blurred) mooches about moodily. Mumbling about Homer in videos she makes of herself.

Or summat. It’s all very deep and meaningful. Or meant to be.

Then lo and behold she’s going all ninja up in the barn where the local all American High School guy watches calmly as he lets loose his Rottweiler on her.

Yep. ‘Cause that’s how he rolls. In between punching male choir members in the throat. He’s just you average neighbour.

But it’s OK. Because she does a whole super-duper dog whispering mind control thing. Of course.

Then she just has a bit of a wash with her Mum and hey presto. No untoward injuries from being savaged by a Rottweiler.

Poor, understandably curious and intense Mum: is questioning her all the while. About when she was-Away..

But the heroine refuses. No, it is not time yet. I have to talk (some more) to Homer…whilst staring moodily and America’s Next Top Model-ly into space.

When did she get around to dying her hair blonde I wondered. With such artful black roots. Over there in Alien land. Or wherever. Who knew that the other side, dimension, who knows, (we sure don’t know yet) had hair dye? But I digress.

Then, to the best of my recall, more mumbling about Homer, an obsession to get online, presumably to really talk to Homer, and a new alliance occurs. Between the heroine and previously described blue-eyed boy. Her apparently and officially deviant, next door neighbour.

OK not technically next door, as they are all individual houses, outwardly expensive and upmarket. But in an oddly deserted, decayed, slightly, state. Clues being the strange debris found earlier by the heroine’s mother.

When she and the heroine go for a night-time walk. And happen to espy said neighbour and friend, videoing each other up on the roof. Doing back-flips. For a laugh. That’ s how boring it is up there I guess.

In the half-built and abandoned housing development. We are meant to think perhaps, that things have slide sideways somehow. The people there have abandoned hope..

So I did like the initial sort of spooky feel to the OA as described. Then the heroine starts spouting alien, presumably, pearls of wisdom to a teacher.

Oh great. An all wise and knowing and wonderful other being. Thing..

 

 

© Copyright Clarissima 2017.  All rights reserved.

The Break. La Trêve. A Belgian Detective murder mystery crime drama. My First Review. Minor spoilers only. On in the United Kingdom on Netflix. In French with English subtitles.

Belgian noir.

La Trêve.  The Break.
My First Review.

So finally with the Break, I found a really good, meaty murder mystery. And when I say mystery, I really mean, mystery. Since we don’t find out who did it: until the very end. Hurray.

The drama leads us, the viewer on a merry dance. Through twists and turns and multiple red herrings strewn across our path. During the process of solving this crime. As seen so to speak, through the eyes of the mesmerisingly intense: Detective.

With his big domed head and almost shining forehead, Detective Johan Peeters looks exceedingly brainy in appearance. Assuming that lovely big domed heads and rounded foreheads: traditionally signify big brains.

Whether this is really the case, who knows. In reality I mean. However it is an accepted sort of trope in dramas. I suggest. Me I kept thinking of the character Fraser, in Cheers and Fraser. But I digress.

Yes, Detective Peeters appears brainy indeed. And certainly proves to be too. In a multilayered and often intuitive-way.

The progress of the solving of the crime by Johan is intertwined with his personal life, the lives of the other Policemen in the small town and their professional lives. As the team working the murder case.

Slowly, from the beginning, Detective Peeters is shown bringing all the local policemen up to scratch. In that Detecting work. He gradually gathers them around him as they improve their performance under his tuition.

But then there are the interludes when Johan is very much alone. And we slowly realise that he is really having rather a rough time of it. Himself…

 

 

 

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This work or any portion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the express written permission of the publisher except for the use of brief quotations in a book review.

admin@ clarissima-adayinthelifeofatvwatcher.london

or

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This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, businesses, places, events and incidents are either the products of the author’s imagination or used in a fictitious manner. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, or actual events is purely coincidental.

 

The Break. La Trêve. A Belgian Detective murder mystery crime drama. My Final Review. Minor spoilers only. On in the United Kingdom on Netflix. In French with English subtitles.

Belgian noir.

The Break. La Trêve.

Final Review.

La Treve/ The Break is set in sumptuous scenery of verdant green. Lakes, rivers and forests of trees. I was imaging those same limpid lakes and rolling grassy banks as being just the same-in ancient times.

The forest beckons, prettily innocent and sparkling in the sunshine. Yet on further glance, its insides are in a sort of silent shadow…Enter if you dare.

Perhaps the silence becomes strange in there. In the air. Like it sometimes does- in really ancient forests. After a while..

There are some really stellar performances all round in this drama I felt. To name them all might give too much away. In this nicely juicy, meaty murder mystery.

But I could mention the Police Chief and the young Policeman as two excellent characters.

Apart from the already described Detective Johan Peeters. Who seems so impossibly and exceedingly tall. And who has the ability to just silently stare into space. As we watch. And somehow make us understand the many myriad meanings of his silent cogitations. Or think we do.

Whilst affixed to the screen and metaphorically on the edge of our seats. In thrall to cinematic tension.

 

 

© Copyright Clarissima 2017.  All rights reserved.

 

This work or any portion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the express written permission of the publisher except for the use of brief quotations in a book review.

admin@ clarissima-adayinthelifeofatvwatcher.london

or

admin@thispageleftintentionally blankpublishingcompany.london

This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, businesses, places, events and incidents are either the products of the author’s imagination or used in a fictitious manner. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, or actual events is purely coincidental.