The Missing Series Two. Notes on episodes Seven and Eight with Final Review at the end. Minor spoilers only. Was on UK television on BBC One.

The Missing Series Two.

Episode Seven.

“1991”.

Some notes and dialogue on first watching.

Great. An extended flashback..

I only stuck it out for this long because of Jean Luc.

Ha ha. Jean Luc insults the Police Sergeant in French.
The German Detective insults him back in German!

It doesn’t take a genius to guess who the baddies/ the bad guy is on BBC.

The domestic side stories are excruciatingly intense. Yet boring at the same time. Stygian in their gloom.

Why is the house party barbecue in a whole set of mazes?

Oh yes the drama helpfully filled in the only clue I missed in that missing half hour. I never revisited.

More family stuff. Bring back Jean Luc..

The annoyingly irksome wife arrives. Let Jean Luc do his thang.

C’mon, Mrs. David Morrisey, time to get empowered.  Yey!
She has uttered the immortal words to Jean Luc:
“So what do we do now?”

So..getting a bit intenseful..
C’mon Jean Luc..
You know what they are going to find..
What did I tell you..

Vaaren, Switzerland.
So..plenty weird.
Back to Germany.

Jean Luc is like the Zen master at detecting.
Great stuff. Finally at the end..

***

 

Episode eight.
Final Episode. “The Mountain”.

Some notes and dialogue on first watching.

TV Announcer:
“The thrilling final..”

If only we could have watched this recap instead. Of the whole gargantuan thing of six episodes. Now at seven. (correction eight).

So finally they get David Morrisey into the quest..
The wife:
“The patterns are the same..”..

So. All quite intenseful.

Here come the trees. And the irksome song..

Note to self: the font of the title of The Missing and the fade in and out in the snow/ white is probably the best thing about this series.

Told you that the character looked nothing like their photographs.  Well now that character looks nothing like his younger self. Already portrayed..

Back to present day.
And Jean Luc Baptiste..

It’s a triumvirate quest now.
Jean Luc Baptiste is so clever..
Jean Luc to David Morrisey and his wife:
“I have a friend at Interpol..”.

Well that was a fairly vile scene..
And in best BBC daylight as well.

Back to the trees. In the forest glow. In the snow.
Ugh. We get back to the beginning of the story..

Ah, it got really good for a while there.

Back to 2014.
Then back to or rather forward, to 2016, present day.

David Morrisey to Jean Luc:
“None of this is real”.
Jean Luc:
“But you are here..”
“You have opened yourself up to new possibilities.”

Dunno why they give Jean Luc dialogue like he was a Zen master.
It continues.
Jean Luc:
“We have learnt a great deal already”.
“We don’t need to push..now”.
But they do. Here we go.
All suspenseful stuff.

The trees jingle in the sky. At the tree tops.

Well suspenseful with a pedestrian air.
Why would an army man take his family into this situation. When they are all out in the clear.
So it’s all getting good now.

I can’t look..
As long as nothing happens to Jean Luc..

Annoyingly over loud music ensues.

The silence stretches out over the scene..
Too long. As always.

And now we will see if my original theory about a character was correct..
Now there’s young Sam. He and the young girl with the horror ridden panda eyes were brilliant.

Oh now we have Jean Luc quoting prose or his own thoughts. It sounds so good and wise. Just because he says it in a French accent.

Now we find out just who Jean Luc is speaking to.
Jean Luc to his wife:
“See you in a minute..”
Jean Luc:
“Dix, neuf, huit, sept, six, cenq, quatre, trois…”

***

Final Review.

So was The Missing any good? Not really. Perhaps, intermittently, from episode six onwards. For me anyway.

As laid out previously in my review, they, the drama makers just had too much fluff, ridiculous, teachy-preachy mixed with superficially artful stuff. Stuffed in between.

The drama would have been a lot more powerful with at least half an hour cut from each episode. Or more. Even half length. Four episodes instead of the interminably tedious eight.

The thing is it doesn’t take a genius to guess/ work out the BBC’s main baddies. Bad guys. Which kind of spoils the fun. In a murder mystery.

 

Postscript.

 

I tend to give BBC One productions a wide berth.

Because if they’re not contorted and twisted under the deemed to be necessary weight and strange Pravda-like responsibility towards the nation in teaching us how to think, feel and view things (for want of a better word)

If it’s not groaning under the weight and strangling and sinister grasp of all that: the drama is usually just histrionically bad.  Being either under or (wildly) over-acted.

 

© Clarissima 2016.  All rights reserved.

The Code. Series Two. A One-Off Review. Minor spoilers only.

The Code Series Two.

Episode One.

West Papua. (New Guinea)

A truck and a jolly blues song plays.
You just know something bad is about to happen..

I am confused about the brother Ned. However he just looks different because he has a beard.

So this is cheerful. Not.

Plus there is a plethora of computer screen imagery. Yawn.

****

Review.
Artful. Intense. But ultimately empty. An ickily prurient side story mistakenly attached. Which is all hugely unlikely. As in the believability stakes.

Much like the whole yawn-some Papua New Guninea thing. Which is apparently peopled with really right on artfully accessorised inhabitants. Like they had been shopping in the jewellery section at (the shop) Top Man.

The whole thing is computer focused: we are continually watching the action through surveillance cameras for example ticking down in time. This device actually does lend an artificial suspense to the second story line. Which this story otherwise would not have had.

Everything is over magnified and overblown in perception as if we were looking at the drama through a blue fishbowl. I think this annoying artifice was meant to represent the autistic experience of the world. Held by the hero.   For me anyway.

I found this style of presentation a bit unwieldy and odd. Like you were standing on deck, in a heaving sea. Whilst interesting in concept, I found this styling to be of deadening effect on the drama.

***