Gotham Series One-My Review PART TWO Final REview and end of series. (Nb. PART ONE Review posted 26th October 2014) Minor Spoilers only. Was on in the UK On Channel Five or channel number 105 on Virgin Media TV.

Gotham my Review Part Two-end of Series One
(Nb. I found this final review which was started at Christmas time last year)

So Gotham, as they most cruelly informed us via voice-over last night on TV: is taking a break and will be back in the New Year.  No!..what am I gonna watch now?  My available stock of good TV programmes is dwindling.  It’s that Christmas television desert come creeping.  Not to rub it in or anything: next year could mean any time.

Same goes for The Walking Dead boo hoo.  Oh well.  I never seem to like much Christmas TV. Apart from the officially feel good Christmas movie.  The children’s ones are the best.  Elf for example.  I might have seen that at least three times.  It’s really kind of boring now except for Will Ferrel as an elf and Bob Neuhart as his Dad.

Then when Will Ferrel makes the journey to New York.  I don’t think I can ever forget when Will as the elf picks the dried chewing gum off the undersides of railings and eats it and first tries to cross the road.  There are more dangerous crossing before that for him, traversing the North Pole.
But I digress.

So Gotham just got better and better.  Didn’t it.  I realised I had secretly upgraded Gotham from tea-time watching fun category-to full blow proper evening series.  The feature film of the night so to speak.

So this process wasn’t quite secret really as it became beknowest to me.  Gotham had taken a few leaps and jumps along the way into fully fledged something really rather good.  Of course, as I declared, I was already in love back in episode one.

So as I predicted in my first write-up on Gotham: the drama was a little cold at first but eventually grew a heart.  And that heart was the relationship between Bruce Wayne and his butler, Alfred.

Yes, Alfred who as I mentioned acts pretty much everybody else off the screen except possibly Ben McCenzie as Jim Gordon.  it was my opinion that that two men were a wonderful pairing.  As they joined forces to look after the boy, Bruce Wayne.

Alfred, upon whom now I may be experiencing a minor girly crush as a character, is original old school butler.  From days of old when Queensbury rules ruled and a butler was a wise cracking cockney who was rather more than handy with his fists.  In fact said butler was likely to have been in and fought in a war.  Had adventures.  Was all round resourceful.

I am reminded of Drake in Ripper Street. Alfred is the butler you might find in days of yore as an adjunct to a young Lord adventurer.  He too would have had experiences as in wars, travelling and adventure.  Exploration even.  Back in the day, I am pretty sure that an Officer’s valet during war was called (wait for it) as batman.  Funny eh.

The other strand of storyline in Gotham that succeeded in giving Gotham a heart was the story of Cat.  probably my favourite character (well apart from my secret crush on Alfred) .  Hugely enjoyable and believable is Cat’s story and her as a character.

Plus Cat’s eventual meeting with young Bruce Wayne (much as we expected) is a deftly told prequel explanation.  Of possibly how Bruce Wayne and Catwoman come to know each other.  Even how Bruce Wayne learns some highly valuable skills.  He also grows, visibly before our eyes.  Under Cat’s tutelage and as a result of their friendship.  Ah.

Fisho is a fairly frozen faced yet incrementally impressive baddie.  She has an enviable array of evil gangstress outfits I suspect she designed herself.  Along with her wild and serpent-like jewellery. Naturally in gold.

Then there is Fisho’s henchman, Wayne. Who is truly sinister in his baby faced chubbiness.  And we know why he is truly a bad guy and just what he has done.  By now.

Then there is Fisho’s unholy alliance with Don Carmine Falceone.  Don Falceone’s performances raises the bar of quality acting in Gotham.  For some reason he strongly reminds me of Gene Hackman.

Oh and the ethereally beautiful subversive Nikita style assassin.  Making the Don tea, in beautiful china.

Although I did like the character of Charlotte she just had to go as she was becoming plaintively annoying.  Whilst most likely still suffering from Post Traumatic Stress disorder.  Of course the crusading Jim Gordon, as all such heroic and broom cleansing (of corrupt departments) roles require; that he can never be happy in love.  Ever.  Ah.

Still, Jim Gordon does get to keep (I think) Charlotte’s completely fabulous apartment.  With an actual log fire.  As previously noted in my first review.  In a skyscraper.  it must be the penthouse.  I guess they have chimneys.

Then there is Donal Logue as Harvey Bullock, another excellent performance as Jim Gordon’s world weary sneeringly cynical side-kick.  The dialogue between Harvey Bullock and Jim Gordon is witty and eloquent. Harvey gets all the best lines.

Of course there are various mad cap adventures and madder, much madder murderers.  Huge and dark cavernous sets: crumbling old municipal buildings, factories, the ever eponymous warehouse.  Oh yes and the ever sinisterly lurking in all its glorious shadowy lamp-lit edifice: of Arkham Asylum.

Jim Gordon is believable if a little stony faced as the true hearted crusader for justice and clearer out of corruption.  From the city, Gotham.  which is suffering this corruption as some kind of sickness or so it is portrayed.  In this Batman prequel as graphic novel made real.

Gotham is also awash with a mighty paintbox.  A palette of imaginatively and stunningly realised scenes.  Gotham is a master class in shadow, light and blinding concrete bright.  Dull greys and blues and monolithic blocks of buildings.

Inside the Police station however it is almost the inner circle of hell.  All circular open staircase, other levels, old wooden bannisters.  In the Police Station the colours are jewel deep in dark shadow.  Artful yellowed lighting glows around.

Gotham as a dramatic creation has style, verve and panache.  The drama has that tea-time zaniness and zap.  Yet dwelling in the painterly land of the graphic novel.

Last but not least there is the monosyllabic but eventually engaging Serious Crime Detectives. Including an Amazon tall and inscrutable ex-love interest storyline.

Then of course there is the Penguin, originally described by me I believe as Jonny Depp as Edward Scissor-hands in appearance and charm.  The Penguin gleefully steals every scene he appears in.

Capriciously unpredictable and psycopathically evil: the Penguin manages to make us like him.  Even with his unfortunate habit of  dispatching potential enemies and obstacles forthwith.  With some nearby handy pointy object.  All sorts of random items The Penguin uses.  Really.

The Penguin inveigles himself into all the warring camps of the ailing, almost infected (it is essayed) corrupted Gotham City.  See it is not just Jim Gordon as the true heart fighting evil: there is Don Carmine Falceone, Fisho and Wayne.  With The Penguin secretly working for/ and or pretty much running everyone.

Oh and lets not even talk about the Penguin’s mother.  A truly horrific and sinister character, mad as a hatter and most brilliantly acted.  No wonder The Penguin is so weird.  Save me from the Penguin’s mother.

***

Some dialogue from Gotham.

Harvey Bullock to crazy Siornis from Sironis Investment:
“What’s with all the warrior baloney?”!

Harvey Bullock to Detective Alvarez:
“Alvarez, Put a zipper on it”
Harvey motions with his thumb and finger pinched together to his lips.
I haven’t seen anyone do that in a long time.

Charlotte to Jim Gordon:
“Tell me it will be OK”
“Tell me there aren’t any monsters?”
Jim Gordon:
“There aren’t any monsters”
But she gazes over his shoulder.
She knows there are monsters.
So does he.

***

Footnotes.

I am pretty sure that Harvey Bullock quotes Shakespeare at one point.

***
The giant see-through clock in the walled window of Charlotte’s apartment is the same as in the top floor cafe’ window of an art gallery in Paris.  You half expect to see Buster Keaton outside, hanging as ever on one of the clock hands.

Gotham Series One-My Review PART TWO Final REview and end of series. (Nb. PART ONE Review posted 26th October 2014) Minor Spoilers only. Was on in the UK On Channel Five or channel number 105 on Virgin Media TV.

Gotham my Review Part Two-end of Series One
(Nb. I found this final review which was started at Christmas time last year)

So Gotham, as they most cruelly informed us via voice-over last night on TV: is taking a break and will be back in the New Year.  No!..what am I gonna watch now?  My available stock of good TV programmes is dwindling.  It’s that Christmas television desert come creeping.  Not to rub it in or anything: next year could mean any time.

Same goes for The Walking Dead boo hoo.  Oh well.  I never seem to like much Christmas TV. Apart from the officially feel good Christmas movie.  The children’s ones are the best.  Elf for example.  I might have seen that at least three times.  It’s really kind of boring now except for Will Ferrel as an elf and Bob Neuhart as his Dad.

Then when Will Ferrel makes the journey to New York.  I don’t think I can ever forget when Will as the elf picks the dried chewing gum off the undersides of railings and eats it and first tries to cross the road.  There are more dangerous crossing before that for him, traversing the North Pole.
But I digress.

So Gotham just got better and better.  Didn’t it.  I realised I had secretly upgraded Gotham from tea-time watching fun category-to full blow proper evening series.  The feature film of the night so to speak.

So this process wasn’t quite secret really as it became beknowest to me.  Gotham had taken a few leaps and jumps along the way into fully fledged something really rather good.  Of course, as I declared, I was already in love back in episode one.

So as I predicted in my first write-up on Gotham: the drama was a little cold at first but eventually grew a heart.  And that heart was the relationship between Bruce Wayne and his butler, Alfred.

Yes, Alfred who as I mentioned acts pretty much everybody else off the screen except possibly Ben McCenzie as Jim Gordon.  it was my opinion that that two men were a wonderful pairing.  As they joined forces to look after the boy, Bruce Wayne.

Alfred, upon whom now I may be experiencing a minor girly crush as a character, is original old school butler.  From days of old when Queensbury rules ruled and a butler was a wise cracking cockney who was rather more than handy with his fists.  In fact said butler was likely to have been in and fought in a war.  Had adventures.  Was all round resourceful.

I am reminded of Drake in Ripper Street. Alfred is the butler you might find in days of yore as an adjunct to a young Lord adventurer.  He too would have had experiences as in wars, travelling and adventure.  Exploration even.  Back in the day, I am pretty sure that an Officer’s valet during war was called (wait for it) as batman.  Funny eh.

The other strand of storyline in Gotham that succeeded in giving Gotham a heart was the story of Cat.  probably my favourite character (well apart from my secret crush on Alfred) .  Hugely enjoyable and believable is Cat’s story and her as a character.

Plus Cat’s eventual meeting with young Bruce Wayne (much as we expected) is a deftly told prequel explanation.  Of possibly how Bruce Wayne and Catwoman come to know each other.  Even how Bruce Wayne learns some highly valuable skills.  He also grows, visibly before our eyes.  Under Cat’s tutelage and as a result of their friendship.  Ah.

Fisho is a fairly frozen faced yet incrementally impressive baddie.  She has an enviable array of evil gangstress outfits I suspect she designed herself.  Along with her wild and serpent-like jewellery. Naturally in gold.

Then there is Fisho’s henchman, Wayne. Who is truly sinister in his baby faced chubbiness.  And we know why he is truly a bad guy and just what he has done.  By now.

Then there is Fisho’s unholy alliance with Don Carmine Falceone.  Don Falceone’s performances raises the bar of quality acting in Gotham.  For some reason he strongly reminds me of Gene Hackman.

Oh and the ethereally beautiful subversive Nikita style assassin.  Making the Don tea, in beautiful china.

Although I did like the character of Charlotte she just had to go as she was becoming plaintively annoying.  Whilst most likely still suffering from Post Traumatic Stress disorder.  Of course the crusading Jim Gordon, as all such heroic and broom cleansing (of corrupt departments) roles require; that he can never be happy in love.  Ever.  Ah.

Still, Jim Gordon does get to keep (I think) Charlotte’s completely fabulous apartment.  With an actual log fire.  As previously noted in my first review.  In a skyscraper.  it must be the penthouse.  I guess they have chimneys.

Then there is Donal Logue as Harvey Bullock, another excellent performance as Jim Gordon’s world weary sneeringly cynical side-kick.  The dialogue between Harvey Bullock and Jim Gordon is witty and eloquent. Harvey gets all the best lines.

Of course there are various mad cap adventures and madder, much madder murderers.  Huge and dark cavernous sets: crumbling old municipal buildings, factories, the ever eponymous warehouse.  Oh yes and the ever sinisterly lurking in all its glorious shadowy lamp-lit edifice: of Arkham Asylum.

Jim Gordon is believable if a little stony faced as the true hearted crusader for justice and clearer out of corruption.  From the city, Gotham.  which is suffering this corruption as some kind of sickness or so it is portrayed.  In this Batman prequel as graphic novel made real.

Gotham is also awash with a mighty paintbox.  A palette of imaginatively and stunningly realised scenes.  Gotham is a master class in shadow, light and blinding concrete bright.  Dull greys and blues and monolithic blocks of buildings.

Inside the Police station however it is almost the inner circle of hell.  All circular open staircase, other levels, old wooden bannisters.  In the Police Station the colours are jewel deep in dark shadow.  Artful yellowed lighting glows around.

Gotham as a dramatic creation has style, verve and panache.  The drama has that tea-time zaniness and zap.  Yet dwelling in the painterly land of the graphic novel.

Last but not least there is the monosyllabic but eventually engaging Serious Crime Detectives. Including an Amazon tall and inscrutable ex-love interest storyline.

Then of course there is the Penguin, originally described by me I believe as Jonny Depp as Edward Scissor-hands in appearance and charm.  The Penguin gleefully steals every scene he appears in.

Capriciously unpredictable and psycopathically evil: the Penguin manages to make us like him.  Even with his unfortunate habit of  dispatching potential enemies and obstacles forthwith.  With some nearby handy pointy object.  All sorts of random items The Penguin uses.  Really.

The Penguin inveigles himself into all the warring camps of the ailing, almost infected (it is essayed) corrupted Gotham City.  See it is not just Jim Gordon as the true heart fighting evil: there is Don Carmine Falceone, Fisho and Wayne.  With The Penguin secretly working for/ and or pretty much running everyone.

Oh and lets not even talk about the Penguin’s mother.  A truly horrific and sinister character, mad as a hatter and most brilliantly acted.  No wonder The Penguin is so weird.  Save me from the Penguin’s mother.

***

Some dialogue from Gotham.

Harvey Bullock to crazy Siornis from Sironis Investment:
“What’s with all the warrior baloney?”!

Harvey Bullock to Detective Alvarez:
“Alvarez, Put a zipper on it”
Harvey motions with his thumb and finger pinched together to his lips.
I haven’t seen anyone do that in a long time.

Charlotte to Jim Gordon:
“Tell me it will be OK”
“Tell me there aren’t any monsters?”
Jim Gordon:
“There aren’t any monsters”
But she gazes over his shoulder.
She knows there are monsters.
So does he.

***

Footnotes.

I am pretty sure that Harvey Bullock quotes Shakespeare at one point.

***
The giant see-through clock in the walled window of Charlotte’s apartment is the same as in the top floor cafe’ window of an art gallery in Paris.  You half expect to see Buster Keaton outside, hanging as ever on one of the clock hands.

Silent witness-New Series-My Review of first few episodes. Mainly Falling Angels. REVIEW PART ONE. Minor spoilers only. On in the UK on BBC One Monday and Tuesday nights @ 9pm. Channel number 101 on Virgin Media TV

Silent witness-New Series

Nb. Episode Three is called Falling Angels.  This review is mainly about that episode.

Silent Witness is looking strangely good.  I like that the two episodes follow on the next night.  I mean the second episode is on the following night.

Perhaps silent Witness were reading my review in A slating of…  Though it, the review was written in fondness and fun.  Point is, the new series seems decidedly more egalitarian in nature.  Meaning that they have relegated the character of Forensic scientist Jack from being overbearing and snarly man mode to just plain Jack.  A bit boring really.  Has Jack been reprogrammed?

Maybe Jack was having his character’s story whole thing as series often do. In the last series of Silent Witness.  Although I did enjoy the interesting distraction of Jack’s eponymously cool warehouse flat and the prerequisite punch bag on a stand.  That Jack punched. whenever feeling upset and stressed. That storyline went all kind of Jack, Private eye investigations for a while.

I am having a hard time taking Silent Witness seriously.  But then I always do.  However this time it is not quite so much fun.  Perhaps it was the God awful blood overload factor in the first episode of Fallen Angels.

Perhaps it was the succession of women suffering  in seemingly every way.  Where we begin for example with an eponymous domestic violence scene straight out of the horror film genre.  Like Stephen King from the seventies film mixed with Midsomer Murders.

Then said victim is seen surreally running through night fields-hunted down by said husband.  In a Land rover.  With his headlights blaring.  well we think so but miraculously he misses her.  Then, things get even more B-movie when: ah but that would be telling.

After that uhum, cliffhanger, the barefoot wife who has been trapped not just by her husband but in
this strangely surreal scene: moves in.  And she just happens to have a handy Stanley knife.  In her hand.

I have not seen the whole episode of three as I ditched it for Celebrity Big Brother.  Which seemed like a lot more fun.  At least I knew I would see no more dead women in the bath.

Well not that you could actually see the woman properly due to the buckets of blood that seemed to have been liberally poured over her. To hide her nakedness perhaps.  Guess nakedness was too indelicate of a sight.  Oil slick coverings of blood being far away much better.

At one point I found myself inwardly remarking: Ah, another ripe woman ready for murdering. Plucking also came to mind.  Since that went better with ripe.

Oh but wait, as the camera lovingly records her steely beauty, we are already suspecting a character to be a serious serial killer.  a necessarily balancing theme this I suspect.  To make up for all the sequential sequences of female, frightened, chopped up flesh.

Still, looking like dear wifey, trapped in the horror movie in sequence number one is fighting back. Necessary balancing theme number two.

Plus just who could it be with the penchant for stabbing lovely lady Priests?   There is only one other possibility.  Balancing theme number three.  We shall see.  I confess I did not see the rest of the episode as described.

Superficial yet sinister silliness in the form of Celebrity Big Brother had beckoned.  The Celebrity Big Brother house mates were trapped too.  In a tiny little house.  And very shortly at least one of them I predict will go stark staring bonkers mad.
Still, I digress.

I realise I have completely forgotten that I have seen Silent Witness episodes one and two.  This one was three.  Out of three and four.  Blimey the first pair of episodes can’t have been that memorable then. They weren’t.  Though mildly enjoyable and vaguely suspenseful.

I am not quite sure if the autopsy scenes with the ludicrous language and the almost microscopic close-ups of bullets being removed from squishy chopped liver looking brains with a gentle yet teasing plop (with an actually visible stretch of shiny silver gloop) are meant to be funny.  Yet these autopsy scenes possibly unintentionally, often are.

Maybe it is the back and forth banter and dialogue between he pathologists, the watching Police Detectives and the ever barkingly loud, Jack.  as the Police and Jack watch Nicki and Mr. Smooth her boss pluck clues as gelatinous objects from dead bodies and poke into jagged blood soaked gashes. On cold dull flesh.

Its a good thing I find Silent witness surreal and silly.  Otherwise it could become too damn sinister. Instead Silent witness has an inadvertent comedy to it.  I don’t quite know why.

Perhaps because I find myself thinking things like Niki, or Niki’s stylist,has been down to the hideous blouse shop again.  And who was it that so cruelly removed Niki’s stylish black leather jacket.  Biker style of course.  Although stylishly flappy in effect, much like Niki’s Farah Fawcett Majors nineties feathered hair.

However on the subject of Niki’s hair I can confidently report that in the first episode of the new series they have released Niki’s hair from its nineties comeback effort and given her a Heidi style double plait, crowned around her head.

This is what Niki wears to go jogging.  Just where do women learn to do these hairstyles I wonder. The same place they find out how to do the French Plait: was there a memo.  If there was I missed it.

In fact I  have tried this Heidi look since and all I can say is that you must need pins.  And who the hell buys pins.  My take on it, I told myself was artful and Japanese in appearance.
But I digress.

The point of this story was mainly that I felt almost disappointed (as I believe we were meant to) that the mysterious yet ever so handsome jogger that Niki meets: is not who we might have conjectured. Oh well.  Lets hope not anyway. Even though we know the dramatic rule of psychopathic handsomeness.

Since Niki leaves the jogger something  hidden.  Inside an origami flapping bird.

***

Footnotes.

 Falling Angels huh.  Fallen Engle being the name for a Varg Veum film I remember it clearly.  Originally because I liked the name.  It looked even better somehow in Norwegian.

***

It is all highly unlikely and incestuous really: the Detectives hanging out in the obviously private Lyle Laboratory (with it’s state of the art equipment and facilities).  Likewise the sight of Niki observing a Police interview in the Police Station.

Silent witness-New Series-My Review of first few episodes. Mainly Falling Angels. REVIEW PART ONE. Minor spoilers only. On in the UK on BBC One Monday and Tuesday nights @ 9pm. Channel number 101 on Virgin Media TV

Silent witness-New Series

Nb. Episode Three is called Falling Angels.  This review is mainly about that episode.

Silent Witness is looking strangely good.  I like that the two episodes follow on the next night.  I mean the second episode is on the following night.

Perhaps silent Witness were reading my review in A slating of…  Though it, the review was written in fondness and fun.  Point is, the new series seems decidedly more egalitarian in nature.  Meaning that they have relegated the character of Forensic scientist Jack from being overbearing and snarly man mode to just plain Jack.  A bit boring really.  Has Jack been reprogrammed?

Maybe Jack was having his character’s story whole thing as series often do. In the last series of Silent Witness.  Although I did enjoy the interesting distraction of Jack’s eponymously cool warehouse flat and the prerequisite punch bag on a stand.  That Jack punched. whenever feeling upset and stressed. That storyline went all kind of Jack, Private eye investigations for a while.

I am having a hard time taking Silent Witness seriously.  But then I always do.  However this time it is not quite so much fun.  Perhaps it was the God awful blood overload factor in the first episode of Fallen Angels.

Perhaps it was the succession of women suffering  in seemingly every way.  Where we begin for example with an eponymous domestic violence scene straight out of the horror film genre.  Like Stephen King from the seventies film mixed with Midsomer Murders.

Then said victim is seen surreally running through night fields-hunted down by said husband.  In a Land rover.  With his headlights blaring.  well we think so but miraculously he misses her.  Then, things get even more B-movie when: ah but that would be telling.

After that uhum, cliffhanger, the barefoot wife who has been trapped not just by her husband but in
this strangely surreal scene: moves in.  And she just happens to have a handy Stanley knife.  In her hand.

I have not seen the whole episode of three as I ditched it for Celebrity Big Brother.  Which seemed like a lot more fun.  At least I knew I would see no more dead women in the bath.

Well not that you could actually see the woman properly due to the buckets of blood that seemed to have been liberally poured over her. To hide her nakedness perhaps.  Guess nakedness was too indelicate of a sight.  Oil slick coverings of blood being far away much better.

At one point I found myself inwardly remarking: Ah, another ripe woman ready for murdering. Plucking also came to mind.  Since that went better with ripe.

Oh but wait, as the camera lovingly records her steely beauty, we are already suspecting a character to be a serious serial killer.  a necessarily balancing theme this I suspect.  To make up for all the sequential sequences of female, frightened, chopped up flesh.

Still, looking like dear wifey, trapped in the horror movie in sequence number one is fighting back. Necessary balancing theme number two.

Plus just who could it be with the penchant for stabbing lovely lady Priests?   There is only one other possibility.  Balancing theme number three.  We shall see.  I confess I did not see the rest of the episode as described.

Superficial yet sinister silliness in the form of Celebrity Big Brother had beckoned.  The Celebrity Big Brother house mates were trapped too.  In a tiny little house.  And very shortly at least one of them I predict will go stark staring bonkers mad.
Still, I digress.

I realise I have completely forgotten that I have seen Silent Witness episodes one and two.  This one was three.  Out of three and four.  Blimey the first pair of episodes can’t have been that memorable then. They weren’t.  Though mildly enjoyable and vaguely suspenseful.

I am not quite sure if the autopsy scenes with the ludicrous language and the almost microscopic close-ups of bullets being removed from squishy chopped liver looking brains with a gentle yet teasing plop (with an actually visible stretch of shiny silver gloop) are meant to be funny.  Yet these autopsy scenes possibly unintentionally, often are.

Maybe it is the back and forth banter and dialogue between he pathologists, the watching Police Detectives and the ever barkingly loud, Jack.  as the Police and Jack watch Nicki and Mr. Smooth her boss pluck clues as gelatinous objects from dead bodies and poke into jagged blood soaked gashes. On cold dull flesh.

Its a good thing I find Silent witness surreal and silly.  Otherwise it could become too damn sinister. Instead Silent witness has an inadvertent comedy to it.  I don’t quite know why.

Perhaps because I find myself thinking things like Niki, or Niki’s stylist,has been down to the hideous blouse shop again.  And who was it that so cruelly removed Niki’s stylish black leather jacket.  Biker style of course.  Although stylishly flappy in effect, much like Niki’s Farah Fawcett Majors nineties feathered hair.

However on the subject of Niki’s hair I can confidently report that in the first episode of the new series they have released Niki’s hair from its nineties comeback effort and given her a Heidi style double plait, crowned around her head.

This is what Niki wears to go jogging.  Just where do women learn to do these hairstyles I wonder. The same place they find out how to do the French Plait: was there a memo.  If there was I missed it.

In fact I  have tried this Heidi look since and all I can say is that you must need pins.  And who the hell buys pins.  My take on it, I told myself was artful and Japanese in appearance.
But I digress.

The point of this story was mainly that I felt almost disappointed (as I believe we were meant to) that the mysterious yet ever so handsome jogger that Niki meets: is not who we might have conjectured. Oh well.  Lets hope not anyway. Even though we know the dramatic rule of psychopathic handsomeness.

Since Niki leaves the jogger something  hidden.  Inside an origami flapping bird.

***

Footnotes.

 Falling Angels huh.  Fallen Engle being the name for a Varg Veum film I remember it clearly.  Originally because I liked the name.  It looked even better somehow in Norwegian.

***

It is all highly unlikely and incestuous really: the Detectives hanging out in the obviously private Lyle Laboratory (with it’s state of the art equipment and facilities).  Likewise the sight of Niki observing a Police interview in the Police Station.

Broadchurch Series Two. My Review of episode One. Minor spoilers only. Monday nights at 9pm. BBC One or channel number 101 on Virgin Media TV. Catch-up on BBC i-player

Broadchurch Series Two

Notes and dialogue on first watching.

So we open with bluebells but it was just a dream.  David Tennant as Detective Inspector Alec Hardy is still living in Broadchurch or by the sea.  In an extra cool little blue cabin.  Do Detectives ever live anywhere other than somewhere supremely cool.  By the sea.  Naturally.

Scene with eponymous Journalists.  On the beach.

So the murderer’s only visitor is a Priest.  In the visitor’s room.  That’s unusual.

Olivia Coleman is the eponymously demoted Traffic Cop/ Policewoman now.

Me I am just waiting ( and hoping) for the appearance of Charlotte Rampling.

Uh oh.
So I am back to my original suspect then.  Plus I did think he was the father of Katie’s baby.

Nb.  When Starey eyed Detctive Inspector Alec Hardy is getting interviewed (improbably) on the beach he mentions that there has been a cliff fall recently. Yes-the Journalists say.

So Olivia as Policewoman (ex-Detective Superintendent) Ellie Miller and the mysterious Claire who we presume to be Alex’s wife are both weeping and girl-ified.  Being barked/ shouted at and squired around by Alec.

So Claire is not Alec’s wife.

Charlotte Rampling on the beach to Katie’s husband:
“I have not practised in years,, I’m not that person any more,I can’t help you..”
Uh huh.  Look all the cliché speech is done now.  So we will expect to see you marching back purposely with a sheaf of papers in: five, four, three, two, one..Any time now really.

Please. ‘Cause you can break up the monotony of Broadchurch-I know you can Charlotte.
Someone has to.

Oh no.  Now we have a new suspect…

Policewoman Ellie Miller and Detective Inspector Alec Hardy:
Her:
I found a letter with a bluebell”
Him:
“What do yo mean, a bluebell?”
Her:
“A bluebell..”

Ellie Miller to Alec:
“What makes you think he killed  those girls?”

Cue to flashback: we see a crying husband and wife (of the dead girls).

Then the camera pans to Lee Hollingsworth (the suspect) he is lounging on his patio, smoking.
His wife on a armchair nearby.  In  hideous flowered jumpsuit. Oh yes.  He is extremely suspicious on the basis of just this tableaux.  Apparently.

***
Review

So as rather surprisingly revealed even before the first episode in a preview I read, Broadchurch two has no new murder in it.  Strictly speaking then this this series is an epilogue or continuation of the first series.

Describing it as two might be a bit of an over-representation of what a second series is expected to be.  Perhaps.  Although i guess they can call it whatever they like.  Broadhchurch continued may not have quite the same ring to it as a title.  Still the viewer cannot help but feel a bit short changed like this is more like budget Broadchurch.  In that they saved on a bundle of something, Work, plotting , Dead body even.  Autopsy and all that jazz.

However wait, is that an exhumation I see before me,.  In barely a blink of a plodding and non- procedural eye.

Oh well. I guess we just go with the flow.  Me I always found Broadchurch seriously underwhelming. Different for a while.  Yet it seemed to collapse under the weight of it’s own (over) pretensions.  Plus nobody lately seems capable of filming the English countryside in truly a horror way.

I know it is possible.  Ben Wheatly can do it.  Sightseers did it.  Created horror in the crisp daylight. Maybe even sun.  But recent English murder mysteries have if anything too much sunlight.  Too much view.

The rest of the drama depends for its dramatic weight upon the characters.  Who do not always come up to spec./ specification.  Of anything. Other than overblown officially eccentric characters, morose or just not that interesting.

Added to that is the odd distance felt from the characters themselves, with only dialogue and various facial grimaces and occasional widely staring eyes.  To go on.  We are not privy to their inner lives. Any of them.

Beyond seeing Olivia Coleman cry and rant furiously.  All a welcome relief actually.  As some interesting action and a touch of depth.  But everyone else pretty much is flat or one to two dimensional.

Yes, I know, DetectiveInspector Alec Hardy is all shouty because he has a back-story.  Plus I forgot he is there in Broadchurch because he works there.  As a Policeman and famously was promoted over Ellie Miller.

I do like Olivia Coleman as an actress.  She was brilliant (as was Paddy Constantine) in Tyrannosaurus.  I did enjoy the expected and formulaic coupling up of Detective Inspector Alec Hardy and Policewoman Ellie Miller, Off on a quest.  Together again. with obviously Ellie Miller re-energised again.   As Alec asks for her help.  Yey.

 Off they go, Ellie Miller moaning, nicely spiteful and spitting with anger.  Over everything.  But we all know of course that the once demoted Detective now working as traffic Cop or Port Authority guard for Sarah Lund in The Killing: will always come back.  To solve that damned case.

Quite often the unsolved  or discredited (in some way) case that resulted in that Detective’s downfall.

Career-wise.  Socially.  The whole caboodle.  Usually said Detective has been driven to drink.  but mostly only if he is male.  Which past-time they will perform coolly of course.  In a down at heel but well stocked bar.  With their coterie of acquaintances.  But I digress.  Particularly since Ellie MIller hasn’t done any of the above.

I did find myself trying to remember some characters in Broadchurch was as well as exactly who died.  In Broadchurch One.  The appearance of a character from Eastender’s sister from that soap opera threw me for a while.

Although all the main central characters are all clear.  The re-appearance of the rather creepy caravan which created a sinister atmosphere of the happening within: was a familiar element of Broadchurch.

That caravan.  The keys.  I remember now.  So is this scene as innocent as it seems?  I wonder.

Broadchurch two looks like a re-examination of the original murder case along with the legal procedural of the Court case of the murderer.  Or so we thought.

Then the rather tiresome inclusion of Alec’s old case that has resurfaced.  with the unlikely tale of the doleful Claire and her unofficial protection. Like that would really happen.

Oh yes and dried flowers in cards.  Bluebells.  What a long time it is since I have seen a dried flower. I think I remember similar flowers as presents.  From what seems like a dim and distant dream of another age.

A nice touch was the dried flowers I felt. Not so much the overlaid visions of bluebell fields in the beginning.  A little bit overflowery in all as an image.  Ah yes, the bluebells.  We are meant to be taking all this seriously.  There will be bluebell clues . mark my words.

So I will patiently watch Broadchurch Two mainly to support a new British production, which is rare, of a murder mystery.  Where I do wonder whether we removed the admittedly beautiful and important character if you like: which is the scenery itself.  Just what would Broadchurch be like?  Better or worse.  I wonder.  Still, there is Charlotte Rampling and Marianne Jean-Baptiste  who look set to do battle with a variety of legal weapons.

The main characters ware all watch-able.  The action fairly bumbles along.  And the cliffs are high, high as the sky and made of burnt yellow.  Just like the sand.

***

Footnotes.

Charlotte Rampling’s character has eyelashes like two feathered and fringed mating butterflies. Thing is.  When will we see her eyes.  But when you do they are letterboxes of bright blue.

***

Marianne Jean-Baptiste is known for her role in the American series Without A Trace.

***

So I have not seen the second episode of Broadchurch Two.  I had not felt like it.  And I don’t often write in negatives.

I have recorded Broadchurch Two.  Possibly will catch up with it later.  Meanwhile:

Silent Witness is looking strangely good.