Note to my Readers of a New/Old Series- Jack Irish on in the UK-FOX Channel or number 157 on Virgin Media TV starting tonight, Monday 24th November 2014 @ 10pm. Three films: 1st is Bad Debts, 2nd is Black Tide (these are repeats) Third is a new film: Dead Point(details of Dead Point to follow) see below for re-postings of original reviews of Black tide and Bad Debts as Part One and Part Two Reviews of Jack Irish

Note to my Readers of a New/Old Series- Jack Irish on in the UK-FOX Channel or number 157 on Virgin Media TV starting tonight, Monday 24th November 2014 @ 10pm. Three films: 1st is Bad Debts, 2nd is Black Tide (these are repeats) Third is a new film: Dead Point(details of Dead Point to follow) see below for re-postings of original reviews of Black tide and Bad Debts as Part One and Part Two Reviews of Jack Irish

Re-posting of Jack Irish Part Two Review

Jack Irish Part Two

See Part One Jack Irish posted on December 24th 2012

So i like the dialogue in Jack Irish it is funny, terse and sometimes poetic when Jack gets drunk and sorrowful. Jack, drunk and slumped on his armchair on the phone to his girlfriend in Sydney:
“The chairs in my parlour seem empty and bare” (ahh..)

Jack & his friend Cam and the horse racing elderly crook are at a funeral of a jockey who died in a house fire. Jack:
“Its like a munchchkins meeting, its wrong to see them off their horses”
Yes, he died in a fire, probably couldn’t reach the smoke alarm to change the battery”!

As laid out in Part one: Jack is a one time high flying successful Lawyer who came down to earth with a bump after a terrible personal tragedy: and has slowly come back to a semblance of his life and self by working in a furniture workshop under the tutelage of a Master Cabinet Maker called Charlie.

 Jack Irish, whose name is revealed as not being Irish at all, still seems to hang out in an Irish pub where all the old men seem to be Irish and talk about an old football team they all supported or played in called the Lions.  Jack’s Dad who liked a drink and had a tendency to get into trouble, sadly died when Jack was young in some kind of fight.

 Jack is friends with all the old men in the Pub, Charlie the cabinet maker and a low level elderly crook who runs some kind of horse racing scam.  The elderly crook has a right-hand man who is an Aboriginal actor by the name of Aaron Pedersen and is called Cam Delray in Jack Irish.

 Cam Delray drives the Jaguar like a dream very successfully away from gun toting gangsters chasing them one time and admirably keeps his calm:
Cam Delaray:
“Do you wanna pass me that box under the seat please?”
 to Jack who sits in the front.  The box has a gun in it.

I say successfully since the Jaguar unfortunately is slower than the gangsters’ car and Cam decided to then fight the gangsters off from behind the car with said gun after a screeching sliding stop of the Jag. Two classic cars in Jack Irish then. Jack’s huge white finned car so far unidentified by me and the blue Jaguar.

The horse racing scam i think is getting the odds talked up on an old horse that the elderly crook buys. The horse still has a bit of racing left in him and so confounds the odds or wins the race.

  Quite how Jack is involved in the racing scam apart from going over to the bookies at the beginning of the race and placing loud bets on their horse to drive up the odds  haven’t figured out yet.  Except that Jack hangs out with the two men and sits in the front seat as Cam drives the crook around.

 According to my research on Jack Irish (more of that at the end of this piece) Jack Irish works as a part time debt collector so presumably for the elderly crook for whom i can’t find a a name and Cam Delray.

Jack is still a lawyer but now only helps people out who come to him in need.  Jack’s old buddy from his old Law Offices helps Jack out with research and hangs out with him. A stereotypically pot bellied burger eating and burping Cop also helps Jack out with information when Jack goes on one of his mysterious quests.

 For the life of me I have no idea where the eponymous Computer Expert (Tec) lady came from as a character. I swear Jack just burst in on her and we were expected to accept that he asked her to solve his Tec problems on a regular basis yet we had never come across her in the Drama.

More dialogue:
Charlie, the Master Craftsman(on being called a carpenter)
“Cabinet makers are to carpenters what Rolex is to sundials”.

Jack (on meeting a mysterious man called Dave)
“Dave?, that’s not really enough, is it?”!
“I was never any good at team sports Dave”..

Jack and his lawyer mate sitting and swigging from a bottle of wine outside at night next to a wooden cupola when Jack’s girlfriend has left for Sydney for a super duper job as a News Reporter:

Jack:”Want another bottle of Château disappointment?”

I like that the music in Jack Irish can be corny but it gets away with it.  In one scene we see Jack and Cam both sitting in the front of the Jag moaning about “the corny music” that the elderly crook insists on having played.

Cam:
“There was no Elvis available in the airport”  So he must have bought this music. (Elvis being not corny at all of course)

Several scenes later we are treated to the sight of the Jaguar gliding along seamlessly down the road, the same previously described as “corny” music playing.  Yet now the music has performed some kind of minor miracle since as it continues to play we find ourselves thinking, hey, this is all right as we notice Jack and Cam in happy silence nodding to the beat of the song and smiling.  In perfect time.  Under the speeding trees  and the wide Australian sky.

As mentioned in Part One of Jack Irish (see December 2012) it is a touch Raymond Chandleresque.  Jack Irish stops just short of being really dark and hard hitting.  Thank goodness.  I wouldn’t like it so much then. Although there were some icky scenes with certain unspecified organs in jars from a grateful somewhat psychopathic ex-client of Jacks’s.  Luckily those did not seem sinister to me but i think they were meant to be.

Oh and i realised that now Jack’s brave & beautiful girlfriend is in Sydney being a Newsreader that i was secretly pleased as i enjoy that rarest of things: a drama peopled by mainly men.  Plus they reversed the sexist trope and we saw Guy in the shower!

Whilst Guy slouches about in non-de-script shirts whilst still managing to look like a missing male model, i am really liking Cam’s outfits:last week Cam wore a double-breasted pale mustard jacket with jeans, check shirt and a giant wild-West style belt buckle.  Cool.

OK here is the bad news:remember my wonder in Part One of my review of Jack Irish about the episodes being two hours long?

 Well after some research it transpires, sadly that this was for a reason. The two episodes i saw were “tele-movies” and there is only two of these episodes. Boo hoo.

 The two episodes of Jack Irish i saw are called:Bad Debts and Black Tide.  The good news perhaps is that these episodes are based on the ‘Jack Irish’ books by Peter Temple.  Hence the demonstrably good dialogue and Raymond chandler Detective style feel to the whole thing.

So no more episodes after those two, it was just a ‘one off’ on FX. (now called FOX)

According to my research:The actor Aaron Pedersen who plays Cam Delray in Jack Irish is in a current Australian series on SBS called The Circuit in which he plays a character called Drew Ellis.  Aaron Pedersen was nominated for a Most Outstanding Actor Award for his role in The Circuit in 2009.

Re-posting of Jack Irish Part Two Review

Jack Irish Part Two

See Part One Jack Irish posted on December 24th 2012

So i like the dialogue in Jack Irish it is funny, terse and sometimes poetic when Jack gets drunk and sorrowful. Jack, drunk and slumped on his armchair on the phone to his girlfriend in Sydney:
“The chairs in my parlour seem empty and bare” (ahh..)

Jack & his friend Cam and the horse racing elderly crook are at a funeral of a jockey who died in a house fire. Jack:
“Its like a munchchkins meeting, its wrong to see them off their horses”
Yes, he died in a fire, probably couldn’t reach the smoke alarm to change the battery”!

As laid out in Part one: Jack is a one time high flying successful Lawyer who came down to earth with a bump after a terrible personal tragedy: and has slowly come back to a semblance of his life and self by working in a furniture workshop under the tutelage of a Master Cabinet Maker called Charlie.

 Jack Irish, whose name is revealed as not being Irish at all, still seems to hang out in an Irish pub where all the old men seem to be Irish and talk about an old football team they all supported or played in called the Lions.  Jack’s Dad who liked a drink and had a tendency to get into trouble, sadly died when Jack was young in some kind of fight.

 Jack is friends with all the old men in the Pub, Charlie the cabinet maker and a low level elderly crook who runs some kind of horse racing scam.  The elderly crook has a right-hand man who is an Aboriginal actor by the name of Aaron Pedersen and is called Cam Delray in Jack Irish.

 Cam Delray drives the Jaguar like a dream very successfully away from gun toting gangsters chasing them one time and admirably keeps his calm:
Cam Delaray:
“Do you wanna pass me that box under the seat please?”
 to Jack who sits in the front.  The box has a gun in it.

I say successfully since the Jaguar unfortunately is slower than the gangsters’ car and Cam decided to then fight the gangsters off from behind the car with said gun after a screeching sliding stop of the Jag. Two classic cars in Jack Irish then. Jack’s huge white finned car so far unidentified by me and the blue Jaguar.

The horse racing scam i think is getting the odds talked up on an old horse that the elderly crook buys. The horse still has a bit of racing left in him and so confounds the odds or wins the race.

  Quite how Jack is involved in the racing scam apart from going over to the bookies at the beginning of the race and placing loud bets on their horse to drive up the odds  haven’t figured out yet.  Except that Jack hangs out with the two men and sits in the front seat as Cam drives the crook around.

 According to my research on Jack Irish (more of that at the end of this piece) Jack Irish works as a part time debt collector so presumably for the elderly crook for whom i can’t find a a name and Cam Delray.

Jack is still a lawyer but now only helps people out who come to him in need.  Jack’s old buddy from his old Law Offices helps Jack out with research and hangs out with him. A stereotypically pot bellied burger eating and burping Cop also helps Jack out with information when Jack goes on one of his mysterious quests.

 For the life of me I have no idea where the eponymous Computer Expert (Tec) lady came from as a character. I swear Jack just burst in on her and we were expected to accept that he asked her to solve his Tec problems on a regular basis yet we had never come across her in the Drama.

More dialogue:
Charlie, the Master Craftsman(on being called a carpenter)
“Cabinet makers are to carpenters what Rolex is to sundials”.

Jack (on meeting a mysterious man called Dave)
“Dave?, that’s not really enough, is it?”!
“I was never any good at team sports Dave”..

Jack and his lawyer mate sitting and swigging from a bottle of wine outside at night next to a wooden cupola when Jack’s girlfriend has left for Sydney for a super duper job as a News Reporter:

Jack:”Want another bottle of Château disappointment?”

I like that the music in Jack Irish can be corny but it gets away with it.  In one scene we see Jack and Cam both sitting in the front of the Jag moaning about “the corny music” that the elderly crook insists on having played.

Cam:
“There was no Elvis available in the airport”  So he must have bought this music. (Elvis being not corny at all of course)

Several scenes later we are treated to the sight of the Jaguar gliding along seamlessly down the road, the same previously described as “corny” music playing.  Yet now the music has performed some kind of minor miracle since as it continues to play we find ourselves thinking, hey, this is all right as we notice Jack and Cam in happy silence nodding to the beat of the song and smiling.  In perfect time.  Under the speeding trees  and the wide Australian sky.

As mentioned in Part One of Jack Irish (see December 2012) it is a touch Raymond Chandleresque.  Jack Irish stops just short of being really dark and hard hitting.  Thank goodness.  I wouldn’t like it so much then. Although there were some icky scenes with certain unspecified organs in jars from a grateful somewhat psychopathic ex-client of Jacks’s.  Luckily those did not seem sinister to me but i think they were meant to be.

Oh and i realised that now Jack’s brave & beautiful girlfriend is in Sydney being a Newsreader that i was secretly pleased as i enjoy that rarest of things: a drama peopled by mainly men.  Plus they reversed the sexist trope and we saw Guy in the shower!

Whilst Guy slouches about in non-de-script shirts whilst still managing to look like a missing male model, i am really liking Cam’s outfits:last week Cam wore a double-breasted pale mustard jacket with jeans, check shirt and a giant wild-West style belt buckle.  Cool.

OK here is the bad news:remember my wonder in Part One of my review of Jack Irish about the episodes being two hours long?

 Well after some research it transpires, sadly that this was for a reason. The two episodes i saw were “tele-movies” and there is only two of these episodes. Boo hoo.

 The two episodes of Jack Irish i saw are called:Bad Debts and Black Tide.  The good news perhaps is that these episodes are based on the ‘Jack Irish’ books by Peter Temple.  Hence the demonstrably good dialogue and Raymond chandler Detective style feel to the whole thing.

So no more episodes after those two, it was just a ‘one off’ on FX. (now called FOX)

According to my research:The actor Aaron Pedersen who plays Cam Delray in Jack Irish is in a current Australian series on SBS called The Circuit in which he plays a character called Drew Ellis.  Aaron Pedersen was nominated for a Most Outstanding Actor Award for his role in The Circuit in 2009.

Re-posting of Jack Irish Part One (first posted in 2012)

Jack Irish

Part One:

So i have mentioned Jack Irish in one of my notes to readers when i first saw it in December 2012.

I would put it under fun TV however it has some dark stuff in it.  There is a har de har part too which i’m not sure really works.  Yet without this jokey side it would be too dark and dreary since the last episode i saw had some pretty horrific murders in it. Even though you don’t see them bullet to body so to speak.  Thank goodness. Jack has come face to face with some pretty smelly out of date bodies though so far in two episodes.

Still, as I’m sure i have written somewhere, a lot is forgiven for Guy Pearce who simply can do no wrong for me.  He did try hard in the first episode to look truly down at heel and half alcoholic even. But Guy can’t help glowing with good health and fitness even as he attempts to look seedy whilst walking through numerous dark and rainy scenes through appropriately dark alleys at night.

 Personally i adore all the loving nods to true Raymond Chandeler-esque Detective fiction style in Jack Irish.  Even the dialogue is terse, funny and at times, poetic.

OK it may try too hard and some of it is corny but hey, did i mention it has Guy Pearce in it?  From the film Memento where Guy as the hero wanders around confused and tattooed to within an inch of his life and living in perpetual flashbacks?  The tattoos are all messages to himself that he has had done before he lost his memory you see. Anyway i digress.

Jack Irish gets better with each episode.  Plus its a jolly, chunky two hours long per episode.  What an unusual thing!  Its a whole proper film.  I’m so used to things being short that i get up and wander off after an hour thinking its ended and have to remind myself to return.

To cut a long story short Jack is a down at heel once high flying lawyer who has a personal tragedy.  We see him spending time in a wood workshop under the tutelage of an elderly Master Craftsman with an Austrian or possibly German accent.

The Master Craftsman is called Charlie and really knows his stuff.  We presume that our hero Jack has been healing in his apprenticeship there.  Guy Pearce still looks like he walked off some lone male catwalk somewhere in a workman’s apron as the very latest thing.

Jack has certainly learnt a lot from what i saw since he can now do perfect dovetail joints.  Charlie, his teacher says things like:
 “here, try this Chilean Mahogany, 100 years old..” when Jack says he isn’t ready Charlie replies:
 “But its only a piece of wood until you’ve worked on it”..

  Bethoven’s symphony Number 7 plays in the workshop scenes.  Nice touch and a cool change form most irksome background so called atmospheric music. I could almost forgive Jack Irish for playing Jazz when Jack is officially relaxing.  Almost..

I haven’t figured out what kind of car Jack Irish drives yet there was a close-up at one point possibly for this very purpose since i could see the name written in silver longhand on the back.  However i missed it.  Suffice it to say Jack’s car is old, its all white and completely gorgeous.  It has long double fins and is large like an old Pontiac.

To be continued in Part Two of Jack Irish.

(having run out of time, not in an apocalyptic way or anything)

Re-posting of Jack Irish Part One (first posted in 2012)

Jack Irish

Part One:

So i have mentioned Jack Irish in one of my notes to readers when i first saw it in December 2012.

I would put it under fun TV however it has some dark stuff in it.  There is a har de har part too which i’m not sure really works.  Yet without this jokey side it would be too dark and dreary since the last episode i saw had some pretty horrific murders in it. Even though you don’t see them bullet to body so to speak.  Thank goodness. Jack has come face to face with some pretty smelly out of date bodies though so far in two episodes.

Still, as I’m sure i have written somewhere, a lot is forgiven for Guy Pearce who simply can do no wrong for me.  He did try hard in the first episode to look truly down at heel and half alcoholic even. But Guy can’t help glowing with good health and fitness even as he attempts to look seedy whilst walking through numerous dark and rainy scenes through appropriately dark alleys at night.

 Personally i adore all the loving nods to true Raymond Chandeler-esque Detective fiction style in Jack Irish.  Even the dialogue is terse, funny and at times, poetic.

OK it may try too hard and some of it is corny but hey, did i mention it has Guy Pearce in it?  From the film Memento where Guy as the hero wanders around confused and tattooed to within an inch of his life and living in perpetual flashbacks?  The tattoos are all messages to himself that he has had done before he lost his memory you see. Anyway i digress.

Jack Irish gets better with each episode.  Plus its a jolly, chunky two hours long per episode.  What an unusual thing!  Its a whole proper film.  I’m so used to things being short that i get up and wander off after an hour thinking its ended and have to remind myself to return.

To cut a long story short Jack is a down at heel once high flying lawyer who has a personal tragedy.  We see him spending time in a wood workshop under the tutelage of an elderly Master Craftsman with an Austrian or possibly German accent.

The Master Craftsman is called Charlie and really knows his stuff.  We presume that our hero Jack has been healing in his apprenticeship there.  Guy Pearce still looks like he walked off some lone male catwalk somewhere in a workman’s apron as the very latest thing.

Jack has certainly learnt a lot from what i saw since he can now do perfect dovetail joints.  Charlie, his teacher says things like:
 “here, try this Chilean Mahogany, 100 years old..” when Jack says he isn’t ready Charlie replies:
 “But its only a piece of wood until you’ve worked on it”..

  Bethoven’s symphony Number 7 plays in the workshop scenes.  Nice touch and a cool change form most irksome background so called atmospheric music. I could almost forgive Jack Irish for playing Jazz when Jack is officially relaxing.  Almost..

I haven’t figured out what kind of car Jack Irish drives yet there was a close-up at one point possibly for this very purpose since i could see the name written in silver longhand on the back.  However i missed it.  Suffice it to say Jack’s car is old, its all white and completely gorgeous.  It has long double fins and is large like an old Pontiac.

To be continued in Part Two of Jack Irish.

(having run out of time, not in an apocalyptic way or anything)

The Fall-Episode Two Minor spoilers-some notes and dialogue and final ( i think) review. BBC Two or channel number 102 on Virgin Media TV Thursdays @ 9pm in the UK

The Fall BBC Two
Episode Two

Detective Superintendent Gibson is in her nightdress.  Floating around the Police station.  Cleavage opportunity I suppose.  Same with her vest.
( I only say this as the camera seems to be focused there-from above-weird)

Blam-Blam!  D.S.I Gibson shoots black balaclava-ed man.  Unmasks him on the floor.
“Help me please, I don’t want to die..”
He says.  He is another handsome man.

Of course it is a dream.
But D.S.I. Gibson wakes up.  And she really is asleep in the office.  On a little camp bed.  A man is stretching in the other room.  Wtf.  For a moment i thought she had actually locked up the handsome murderer next door.

Ah, more D.S.I Gibson in  the shower, head and face up to the water.  Dramas just love to get women under the shower.

Rose:
to handsome murderer:
“Your’re not really him, are you?”
He looks at her.
Rose seems confused about her relationship with the man who raped her. ( i think)  unless she is just trying to save her life.

Likewise the baby-sitter seemed strangely turned on by the fact that the murderer rapist or attacked her.  Not quite sure.

D.S.I Gibson’s questioning technique consists of her staring, slightly squinty-eyed at the other person and asking ridiculously leading questions:
“Violently?!”
“Violently angry enough to leave?”! she unaccountably shouts at the innocent husband of Rose. Rose having mysteriously disappeared.

Apart from weakly sparring, as is required in all Detective dramas with the boring beardy man boss. all D.S.I Gibson does is she moons about  looking moody.  She snivels a bit at the first autopsy.

Then D.S.I. Gibson she seems to have cheered up a bit by the time she and the pathologist hold a special duplicate giant pair of scissors experimentally above the already stabbed body.
I dunno, it didn’t look like a match to me.

So you see the serial killer is a nice Dad too.  Too bad the babysitter appears to be walking to her death.

“Midway upon the journey..” the baby sitter reads.

Yes.  All the young women he meets seem unable to believe that he is a mad murderer.  In spite of the dreadful things he has, i think, done to them.  Odd.

Oh yes and the handsome murderer quotes Camus.  How cool.

Finally D.S.I. Gibson gets a bit aerated but is immediately reprimanded by beardy overlord Boss.  Who is forever turning up in his black chauffeur driven limousine and barking: “get in” peremptorily at people.  Including D.S.I Gibson.

Meanwhile.  In the boot of the car of mystic murderer we hear:
(muffled crying) (Mmmm  mmmm!)
It’s almost funny.

The end.  For now.

***

So The Fall is really ridiculous.  More than slightly icky in scenes. The speed of the pace of the drama has speeded up slightly.  From sloth like to snail-like.  with a slimy slither.

However just as i could feel myself buying into the Fall, actually believing in these asynchronous scenes of intensity and dullness all a jumble: i remembered that wound-down feeling of the Fall.  Like a record meant to be played at a faster speed has erroneously been played slower.

Maybe it’s just me.  Who thinks this.  This glacial, art filled pace in dramas certainly seems to be the latest fashion.

Bespoke or bespeaking of depth, intensity and mood.  Presumably.  Trouble is this crawling stupor of movement and filmic action is attached like unseen ether to the edges of everything that happens in The Fall.  And it doesn’t work.

There are times in the drama that everything comes together  and I am seriously creeped out.  By the everyday actions and calmness of the serial killer.  How nice and smart and believable he looks in his suit.  His valuable photo I.D.  What does the I.D. even say.  Nothing probably.  Just him, Bereavement Counsellor.  Lovely.

 How the mystic murderer manages to finagle then inveigle his way into the hospital room of one of his victims.  Presumably he wore a mask when he attacked her.  That was a creep-y scene.  But then the victim starts expounding on her rape fantasies and what website she went on and mumbles how it was just a fantasy, it wasn’t real.  Great.

Nice Counsellor murderer then gives her sensible wise advice.  He is good at his job.  Then he asks her about the website.  I am left wondering how did he originally meet this victim.  On the website: or is he just being nosy and lascivious .

It is true that handsomeness is confounding.  Certainly the handsomeness, charm and persona of the murderer seems to be confusing nearly everyone. Hopefully D.S.I Gibson can stand firm against the apparently deadly charms of the smooth and avuncular murderer.  And all round good egg Dad.

Ideally D.S.I. Gibson will meet the murderer sans floaty low cut nightdresses with something more functional instead.  I thought D.S.I. Gibson looked punchily cool in her uniform.  Mind you anything else would do.  Apart from D.S.I. Gibson’s so far floaty ethereal garb.

I did try to imagine, for fairness and comparison: a picture of a Scandinavian Detective, who happened to be in a vest or nightie.  Yes, but in those series the clothes seem irrelevant, matter of fact.  No big deal.  In the Fall however, the focus is of dwelling, lingeringly over the women.  I got the same feeling watching a particular Woody Allen film.   Less face, more bod/ body.

I read that the makers of The Fall had answered the criticism of The Fall  of being exploitative by explaining that they wanted to show a handsome, normal man as a serial killer.  This is how he would look at women.  Something like that.

However all the lingering shots of women, whether D.S.I. Gibson, Rose, or the babysitter, often precede the killer’s arrival.  So he is not there.  It is not his view of the women we are seeing.  It is how the drama presents them.

Unless, really deep like, this over concentration on the physical aspects of women throughout, is meant to represent how the mystic murderer thinks of women.  All the time.

I definitely found the scene with the schoolgirl babysitter icky indeed. Was it quite so necessary for it to be sexy I wonder.  I began to find it tiresome and manipulative as a scene.  Which then all descends into semi almost embarrassing farce.

As the more than disturbed, depressed indeed apparently suicidal teenager is tied to a bed.  Briefly, we get a glimpse of the mystic murder’s six pack squared.  In his black boxers.  Woopie doo. All of this is in turn: briefly sinister and embarrassingly flat.  I don’t know why.

Such is the experience of watching The Fall for me.  There are interludes where some kind of cogent story coalesces and the characters become briefly animated.

Goodness only knows about the Police investigation though.  There are precious few details to be had from D.S.I Gibson’s occasional barks of mono-syllabic orders, random and unconnected Zen-like questioning and spaced out dreamy interludes. That are meant to be so very meaningful.  But are not.

The fact that I believe, in the drama for a while, as I am checking out the experience at the same time with a certain cynicism: is that I am aware I have been subject to a series of semaphore like signals within.  Superficial settings soaked in something like cliché’.  Covered on top with glossy art.

There are times when the moody near (now) mystic murder is now practically presented as the moral core of the drama as if he was being kind or even saving these girls.  Like some Western Kung Fu hero.  In a series.

There are times when the murderer is sinister and there are times when he is just a bit boring.  Me, I just got tired of looking at his beardy, unrevealing face.

If only D.S.I Gibson could tear herself away from her inexplicable camp bed in the office or the magnetic indeed immobilising Kyrptonite pull of the hazardous presence of mirrors that she encounters.  Everywhere.

If only D.S.I. Gibson actually had some actual agency, some proactive behaviour and took charge of something, anything, even the investigation.  Told the beardy boss with the insufferably shiny shoes (“Holy Mother of God-shiny shoes!”) ( courtesty of Gotham) where to get off.

If only I had never watched Scandinavian series with women detectives. I might think that The Fall was good.   Rather than questionably morally bankrupt and deeply dubious.

The Fall-Episode Two Minor spoilers-some notes and dialogue and final ( i think) review. BBC Two or channel number 102 on Virgin Media TV Thursdays @ 9pm in the UK

The Fall BBC Two
Episode Two

Detective Superintendent Gibson is in her nightdress.  Floating around the Police station.  Cleavage opportunity I suppose.  Same with her vest.
( I only say this as the camera seems to be focused there-from above-weird)

Blam-Blam!  D.S.I Gibson shoots black balaclava-ed man.  Unmasks him on the floor.
“Help me please, I don’t want to die..”
He says.  He is another handsome man.

Of course it is a dream.
But D.S.I. Gibson wakes up.  And she really is asleep in the office.  On a little camp bed.  A man is stretching in the other room.  Wtf.  For a moment i thought she had actually locked up the handsome murderer next door.

Ah, more D.S.I Gibson in  the shower, head and face up to the water.  Dramas just love to get women under the shower.

Rose:
to handsome murderer:
“Your’re not really him, are you?”
He looks at her.
Rose seems confused about her relationship with the man who raped her. ( i think)  unless she is just trying to save her life.

Likewise the baby-sitter seemed strangely turned on by the fact that the murderer rapist or attacked her.  Not quite sure.

D.S.I Gibson’s questioning technique consists of her staring, slightly squinty-eyed at the other person and asking ridiculously leading questions:
“Violently?!”
“Violently angry enough to leave?”! she unaccountably shouts at the innocent husband of Rose. Rose having mysteriously disappeared.

Apart from weakly sparring, as is required in all Detective dramas with the boring beardy man boss. all D.S.I Gibson does is she moons about  looking moody.  She snivels a bit at the first autopsy.

Then D.S.I. Gibson she seems to have cheered up a bit by the time she and the pathologist hold a special duplicate giant pair of scissors experimentally above the already stabbed body.
I dunno, it didn’t look like a match to me.

So you see the serial killer is a nice Dad too.  Too bad the babysitter appears to be walking to her death.

“Midway upon the journey..” the baby sitter reads.

Yes.  All the young women he meets seem unable to believe that he is a mad murderer.  In spite of the dreadful things he has, i think, done to them.  Odd.

Oh yes and the handsome murderer quotes Camus.  How cool.

Finally D.S.I. Gibson gets a bit aerated but is immediately reprimanded by beardy overlord Boss.  Who is forever turning up in his black chauffeur driven limousine and barking: “get in” peremptorily at people.  Including D.S.I Gibson.

Meanwhile.  In the boot of the car of mystic murderer we hear:
(muffled crying) (Mmmm  mmmm!)
It’s almost funny.

The end.  For now.

***

So The Fall is really ridiculous.  More than slightly icky in scenes. The speed of the pace of the drama has speeded up slightly.  From sloth like to snail-like.  with a slimy slither.

However just as i could feel myself buying into the Fall, actually believing in these asynchronous scenes of intensity and dullness all a jumble: i remembered that wound-down feeling of the Fall.  Like a record meant to be played at a faster speed has erroneously been played slower.

Maybe it’s just me.  Who thinks this.  This glacial, art filled pace in dramas certainly seems to be the latest fashion.

Bespoke or bespeaking of depth, intensity and mood.  Presumably.  Trouble is this crawling stupor of movement and filmic action is attached like unseen ether to the edges of everything that happens in The Fall.  And it doesn’t work.

There are times in the drama that everything comes together  and I am seriously creeped out.  By the everyday actions and calmness of the serial killer.  How nice and smart and believable he looks in his suit.  His valuable photo I.D.  What does the I.D. even say.  Nothing probably.  Just him, Bereavement Counsellor.  Lovely.

 How the mystic murderer manages to finagle then inveigle his way into the hospital room of one of his victims.  Presumably he wore a mask when he attacked her.  That was a creep-y scene.  But then the victim starts expounding on her rape fantasies and what website she went on and mumbles how it was just a fantasy, it wasn’t real.  Great.

Nice Counsellor murderer then gives her sensible wise advice.  He is good at his job.  Then he asks her about the website.  I am left wondering how did he originally meet this victim.  On the website: or is he just being nosy and lascivious .

It is true that handsomeness is confounding.  Certainly the handsomeness, charm and persona of the murderer seems to be confusing nearly everyone. Hopefully D.S.I Gibson can stand firm against the apparently deadly charms of the smooth and avuncular murderer.  And all round good egg Dad.

Ideally D.S.I. Gibson will meet the murderer sans floaty low cut nightdresses with something more functional instead.  I thought D.S.I. Gibson looked punchily cool in her uniform.  Mind you anything else would do.  Apart from D.S.I. Gibson’s so far floaty ethereal garb.

I did try to imagine, for fairness and comparison: a picture of a Scandinavian Detective, who happened to be in a vest or nightie.  Yes, but in those series the clothes seem irrelevant, matter of fact.  No big deal.  In the Fall however, the focus is of dwelling, lingeringly over the women.  I got the same feeling watching a particular Woody Allen film.   Less face, more bod/ body.

I read that the makers of The Fall had answered the criticism of The Fall  of being exploitative by explaining that they wanted to show a handsome, normal man as a serial killer.  This is how he would look at women.  Something like that.

However all the lingering shots of women, whether D.S.I. Gibson, Rose, or the babysitter, often precede the killer’s arrival.  So he is not there.  It is not his view of the women we are seeing.  It is how the drama presents them.

Unless, really deep like, this over concentration on the physical aspects of women throughout, is meant to represent how the mystic murderer thinks of women.  All the time.

I definitely found the scene with the schoolgirl babysitter icky indeed. Was it quite so necessary for it to be sexy I wonder.  I began to find it tiresome and manipulative as a scene.  Which then all descends into semi almost embarrassing farce.

As the more than disturbed, depressed indeed apparently suicidal teenager is tied to a bed.  Briefly, we get a glimpse of the mystic murder’s six pack squared.  In his black boxers.  Woopie doo. All of this is in turn: briefly sinister and embarrassingly flat.  I don’t know why.

Such is the experience of watching The Fall for me.  There are interludes where some kind of cogent story coalesces and the characters become briefly animated.

Goodness only knows about the Police investigation though.  There are precious few details to be had from D.S.I Gibson’s occasional barks of mono-syllabic orders, random and unconnected Zen-like questioning and spaced out dreamy interludes. That are meant to be so very meaningful.  But are not.

The fact that I believe, in the drama for a while, as I am checking out the experience at the same time with a certain cynicism: is that I am aware I have been subject to a series of semaphore like signals within.  Superficial settings soaked in something like cliché’.  Covered on top with glossy art.

There are times when the moody near (now) mystic murder is now practically presented as the moral core of the drama as if he was being kind or even saving these girls.  Like some Western Kung Fu hero.  In a series.

There are times when the murderer is sinister and there are times when he is just a bit boring.  Me, I just got tired of looking at his beardy, unrevealing face.

If only D.S.I Gibson could tear herself away from her inexplicable camp bed in the office or the magnetic indeed immobilising Kyrptonite pull of the hazardous presence of mirrors that she encounters.  Everywhere.

If only D.S.I. Gibson actually had some actual agency, some proactive behaviour and took charge of something, anything, even the investigation.  Told the beardy boss with the insufferably shiny shoes (“Holy Mother of God-shiny shoes!”) ( courtesty of Gotham) where to get off.

If only I had never watched Scandinavian series with women detectives. I might think that The Fall was good.   Rather than questionably morally bankrupt and deeply dubious.